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artillery fighting between turkey and syria. yesterday syrian activists predict that the assad regime will fall. this was held by the u.s. institute of peace, and it is close to two hours. >> good morning. in jim marshall, the new president of the institute of peace, which i am delighted to tell you, and i am pleased everyone is here for an import -- to hear about and the port project that has been sponsored by the institute for peace. my job is to introduce steve heideman. he has directed the center for democracy and civil studies -- civil society at georgetown. he -- he is a terrific asset for the institute. this project is driven by syrians, with technical assistance and other kinds of assistance from the institute and a sister institute in germany. it is important these efforts are driven by local populations, things that are handed down from the united states did not work all that well. we are pleased that you are here. i hope you have lots of questions, and if i can turn this over to you -- >> thank you para much, and let me add my welcome to you. we are delighted to see you her
, and children have been massacred by the assad regime over the past 20 months. violent extremists are flowing into the fight. our ally turkey has been attacked. the conflict threatens stability in the region. america can take pride in the blows that our military and intelligence professionals have inflicted on al qaeda, pakistan, afghanistan, including the killing of osama bin laden. these are real achievements one at a high cost. al qaeda remains a strong force, however, in yemen and somalia, libya, other parts of north africa, iraq, and now in syria, and other extremists have been ground across the region. drones and modern instruments of war are important tools in our fight, but are no substitute for national security strategy for the middle east. the president is fond of saying that the tide of war is receding. i want to believe him as much as anyone se. but when we look at the middle east today, with iran closer than ever to nuclear weapons capability, with the conflict in syria threatening to destabilize the region, and with a violent extremists on the march, and with an american ambass
to a ba shall al-assad's regime and there are some more democrat cli inclined shall we say to presumably would want to have a better relationship with the united states with the west and other friendly countries in the middle east, whether saudi arabia or qatar or some of the other countries actively involved in what's going on in syria a. the great concern the obama administration has had and the reason why the u.s. has not sought to arm the rebels is because some of those rebels may be totally opposed to the united states, maybe closer to al qaeda, for example, than to the united states, so once you start arming rebels in a major way, you're not sure where those weapons are going to wind up, and that's been the big concern of the obama administration right now. how do you make sure that the weapons you provide rebels are really going to the good guys as it were as opposed to the potential bad guys and that's not an easy question to answer. >> never. in fact, we have countless examples where this has gone awry. hold the thought for a moment. if you could stand by, i have a lot more ques
of the opposition who share our values and ensure they obtain the arms they need to defeat assad's tanks, helicopters and fighter jets. nbc's first read pointing out that reports of cia doing something covertly like this in syria. so something going on as we speak. the u.s. government did this with libya. basically arming the opposition. and you know, your men ri's men ri is only my friend for so long. is that a wise approach? >> no. i have spent time on this issue. there's no doubt providing nonlethal communication support is extraordinary important and secretary clinton announced massive amount of humanitarian assistance and ku dos to the administration for doing that. the real problem here is that there's this struggle within the romney campaign itself over syria between neo-conservatives to militarily intervene and those who actually are more reticent and the problem is that mr. romney flip flops between one group and the other and can't quite decide which one is more important. the bottom line, however, for purposes of american interest in the middle east, arming a rag tag group of
inside their country to a conflict with turkey. jon: bashar al-assad's forces have enough of a problem just containing, just battling their own population, the rebel fighters within syria. if they have to take on a force from outside, namely turkey, are they going to be able to handle that? >> no, they could not. quite frankly, i don't think they can handle the rebels if we gave them the weapons that they desire and some of the information that they desperately need, not even to speak of a no-fly zone, if we just armed them properly i think the syrian military would have significant problems with the rebels as we've already seen. jon: but then you wind up with the question of who fills the vacuum. if bashar al-assad were to fall who fills the vacuum, and can we be certain that the rebels are going to wind up being our friends? >> well, we cannot. i don't think anybody would be able to predict that, and certainly what we've seen in egypt and also in libya tells you just how challenging this is. we do know what we have there now. we have a brutal dictatorship where people are socially, p
-- village was not targeted. president bashar al-assad is -- for the time being, he is not really -- he does not want to see this. the russians and the chinese would not support such a move. it is not in the syrian interest to act in a very aggressive manner. the turks are very nervous. they have seen border violations on several occasions. let's not forget that back in june, two planes were shot down by the syrians. the turks are very nervous about these developments. >> are you saying that the situation will likely not escalate? >> i do not think the situation will escalate for the time being. neither side is interested in escalation. of course, turkey is using very strong language. that is a matter of national honor, so to speak. but these revenge attacks we have seen carried out by turkey on syrian territory today helps cool down the mood. neither side is really wishing to see a further deterioration of the situation. for this reason, you will see a calming down of the situation. >> do you think what happened in turkey could be used by nato as a pretext for getting involved in the confli
where more than 30,000 men, women and children have been massacred by assad regime over the past 20 months. violent extremists are flowing into the fight. our ally turkey has been attacked and the conflict threatens stability in the region. america can take pride in the blows that our military and intelligence professionals have inflicted on al qaeda in pakistan and afghanistan including the kill of usama bin laden. these are real achievements won at a high cost. al qaeda remains a strong force however in yemen and somalia, in libya, and other parts of north africa, in iraq and now in syria and other extremists have gained ground across the region. drones and modern instruments of war are important tools in our fight but they are no substitute for a national security strategy for the middle east. the president is fond of saying that the tide of war is receding and i want to believe him as much as anyone else but when we look at the middle east today, with iran closer than ever to nuclear weapons capability, with the conflict in syria threatening to destablize the region and with vio
to be syrian army officers and assad regime security forces. leland vittert is live in our middle east bureau with the latest. leland? >> reporter: gregg, this really shows how sophisticated these attacks are becoming. these bombings were sophisticated on number of levels, happening within minutes of each other, well-coordinated. not only that, the bombers were able to get in a very secure part of aleppo near the syrian headquarters. lastly the bombs themselves were well-made and clearly devastating in their effect. images coming from syrian state tv shows the same kind of damage to full blocks of aleppo in the government controlled areas. same kind of damage we're seeing in the rebel controlled areas coming from those deadly attacks with certainian -- syrian artillery. this points much more to jihadist movements rather than homegrown rebel fighters, fighters coming out of places like libya and iraq with expertise and also al qaeda linkage what we're seeing here in syria. this fits much more with the syrian government narrative going forward which complicates, things, gregg. you know it used
border, which has led to a loss of life, turkish civilians. it is time for the assad regime to step down. they continue to kill innocent civilians in syria and its time for the syrian people to be all to determine future in a country that is free of this kind of brutality. >> was admiral stavridis' response to that appropriate, proportional, or did they counter fire for too long? and did mr. panetta have any contact with her case officials? >> the secretary has not had any contact with turkish officials. certainly we respect the inherent right of self-defense displayed by turkey. >> i was a portion of today's pentagon briefing. you can see the entire event in our video library. and in just a couple of minutes comest defense campaign 2012 conference continues with a new jersey senate debate between democratic incumbent bob menendez and republican challenger, joe kyrillos a)i"aa! >> i have all the channels. house, senate plus author book reviews come the speeches, those kinds of things. @l.a. bill is coming up on the floor in the house, i watch camino, which channel i want to see because i
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)